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Monkeypox Vaccination Offered at Atlanta Black Pride Events

There have been more than 1,400 laboratory positive cases of monkeypox in Georgia. The majority of cases in the state and in this outbreak nationally are in men who have sex with men with sexual or close, skin-to-skin contact reported in the 21 days prior to their infection.

 

Atlanta – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) and metro Atlanta health districts are offering monkeypox vaccinations at various locations and times during Atlanta Black Pride. A list of vaccination sites and hours of operation can be found on the DPH website. In most cases, walk-ins are welcome.

 

There have been more than 1,400 laboratory positive cases of monkeypox in Georgia. The majority of cases in the state and in this outbreak nationally are in men who have sex with men with sexual or close, skin-to-skin contact reported in the 21 days prior to their infection.

 

“Atlanta Black Pride is a time for celebration and reconnecting with friends, but we also want to ensure we are not missing the opportunity to provide important education about and vaccination for monkeypox,” said Alexander Millman, M.D., DPH chief medical officer. “DPH, along with our health districts and community partners, are working together to do everything we can to keep monkeypox from spreading so we can end this outbreak.”

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has made 5,500 additional doses of monkeypox vaccine available to Georgia, specifically for vaccination efforts leading up to and during Atlanta Black Pride.

 

Monkeypox vaccinations are available throughout Georgia, at all times not just during Atlanta Black Pride, to individuals meeting the criteria.

Persons of any gender identity or sexual orientation with any of the following:

  • Have had multiple or anonymous sex partners with men who have sex with men in the last 14 days
  • Have had skin-to-skin or intimate contact (e.g., kissing, hugging) with persons who have had a rash or are suspected of having monkeypox in the last 14 days.
  • Have had skin-to-skin or intimate contact (e.g., kissing, hugging) with persons at large venues or events in the past 14 days.
  • Have engaged in commercial and/or transactional sex in the past 14 days (e.g., sex in exchange for money, shelter, food, and other goods or needs)
  • Are HIV positive, or on HIV PrEP, or diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the last 90 days.

To make an appointment for monkeypox vaccination anywhere in the state, visit https://dph.georgia.gov/monkeypox.

If you think you may have monkeypox, seek testing as soon as possible. To avoid potential spread of monkeypox to others, stay isolated until your rash has healed, and a new layer of skin has formed.

There are things you can do to protect yourself from getting monkeypox:

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.
  • Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer

For more information about monkeypox, visithttps://dph.georgia.gov/monkeypox or https://

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